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French Onion Soup page 49 'The Better Health Cookbook'
French Onion Soup page 49 'The Better Health Cookbook'

One of the most admired skills in any cook’s repertoire is the ability to create wholesome, tasty soups and stews. Cooks with these admirable attributes frequently utilize soups and stews as highly versatile comfort foods, and with good reason. Picture a bitterly gold day and exhilarating hot soups and stews come to mind. During a boring bout in bed, throat soothing soups are the best restorative medicine. On sizzling summer days, rejuvenating cold soups quickly lower our thermostats. Hot or cold, soups are time-proven delights, ready to add zest and variety to our lifestyles. 

     Soups and stews are truly the most broad-based of any food group. Their range of enchanting flavors stems from almost endless choice of vegetables, meats and fish. With this variety, there’s a compatible soup for any menu you may plan. Soups are most popularly served as a separate course in luncheons or dinners. Some soups and stews are excellent as a main course. In any event, soups are always welcome. Among your acquaintances, can you recall anyone who does not like soup? Well-rounded home cooks and professional chefs soon develop a knack for preparing a number of these table delights; ready to enhance the pleasures of a widespread array of luncheons and dinners.

     Most soups are uncomplicated to create, and for convenience, most can be prepared several hours before serving. The secret to making great soups is simple. Always use good basic ingredients. The best Mirepoix (carrots, celery and onions), herbs (thyme, parsley stems and bay leaf) and chicken, beef or veal stock is essential. In the following webpage, you will find recipes and step-by-step techniques for dozens of delightful soups and stews. With these taste wonders in your repertoire, you will develop an understanding of the chemistry of the world’s finest dishes.

         

About Salt & Sodium
Onions, Carrots and Celery

 

A natural source of sodium can be found in the basic of vegetables, and sodium (salt), as we all know, does provide flavor. However, sodium (processed salt) can be a problem for some people, especially those with congestive heart disease or hypertension. In general, high amounts of sodium should be avoided. To achieve maximum flavor without the need to add sodium in the form of table salt, kosher salt or sea salt, we will use three basic vegetables – onions, carrots, and celery – in most soups and stews. Together, they provide natural vegetables flavor and natural sodium content. When onions, carrots and celery are dry sautéed using no oil, the natural flavors are released into the dish. When sautéed in oil, the natural flavors cannot escape the coating of oil additional sodium (salt) is necessary to flavor the food. These basic vegetables provide the following:

·         1 medium onion: 54 mg sodium

·         1 medium carrot: 28 mg sodium

·         1 stalk celery: 35 mg sodium

         

About Tomatoes & Beans

Many of the most popular recipes use either tomatoes or dried beans as another source of flavor. When tomatoes are called for, always try to use fresh, ripe tomatoes; plum tomatoes are the best. When the recipe calls for dried beans, home-cooked beans are always the first choice, and we have provided a simple that is easy to follow and prepare and that has better flavor than canned varieties. When using canned goods, always consult the Nutrition Facts on the label, (it is now possible to find some dried beans that are canned without salt.)

·         1 cup Homemade Beans: 356 mg sodium – (from natural source)

·         1 cup canned beans: 750 mg sodium (processed)

·         1 cup chopped fresh tomatoes: 16 my sodium (from natural source)

·         1 cup canned tomatoes: 391 mg sodium (processed)     

         

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Homemade Beans

 

Yields: 1 ½ to 2 cups depending on beans used

Preparation Time: 2 ½ hours

Equipment: Measuring cups and spoons,  2-quart Saucepan with cover, Kitchen Machine food cutter, French Chef knife, Cutting Board

 

1              cup dried bean

1              small onion, chopped blade #3

1              clove garlic, minced

½             teaspoon fresh chopped or dried thyme

1              small bay leaf

1              ham hock or 2 strips bacon, optional

3              cup chicken broth or homemade chicken stock (see Stocks & Sauces for recipe)

 

Rinse and sort beans, set aside.

 

In a hot dry 2 quart over medium heat, dry sauté onion and garlic until slightly browned. Place the beans, thyme, bay leaf, ham hock or bacon, if using, in the 2-quart and cover with about 3 inches of chicken stock and stir to combine. Bring to a rapid boil. Remove from the heat, and cover the pan close the vent and let stand about 1 hour. Don’t peek.

 

To resume cooking, check the liquid level in the pan. The beans should be covered by about 1 to 2 inches of liquid. If they have absorbed the liquid, add water or chicken stock as needed. Cover the pan, close the vent and cook over low or medium-low heat until the beans are tender, 1 to 1 ½ hours. Remove the ham hock if used.

 

Serve the beans as a side dish or use in recipe as needed. The cooked beans can be covered tightly for up to three days or frozen for longer storage.

 

 

Per ½ cup Serving, 132 calories; ½ gram Fat (3% calories from fat); 13½ grams Protein; 23 gram Carbohydrates;  0 mg Cholesterol; 256 mg Sodium.

         

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Chickpea Soup

      with Cumin

     and Cilantro

 Sopa de Garbanzas 


Serves 6

Preparation Time: 40 minutes

Equipment: French chef knife, Kitchen Machine food cutter, 3-quart Saucepan, Food Mill or Blender

 

1 ½         cups cooked chickpeas

1              onion, coarsely chopped, #3 French fry blade

1 ½         teaspoons cumin seeds, ground fine

4              cups (1 L) low sodium beef or chicken stock (see homemade stocks)

1              tablespoon flour (whole wheat optional)

3              tablespoons unsalted butter

½             cup (120 ml) light cream,* or half and half

                Sea or Kosher salt & pepper to taste (optional)

2              tablespoons cilantro, chopped

 

In a 3-quart saucepan (3L utensil) combine chickpeas, onion, cumin, and stock. Bring to a slow boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Puree the mixture in food mill or blender and return to the pan. (If in a blender, low speed and with measuring cup cap removed).

 

In a separate bowl, make a paste by mixing flour and 2 tablespoons softened butter and add to the soup mix in small amounts at a time. After each addition, whisk until smooth. Simmer over low heat for 10 minutes.

 

Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of butter and cream while stirring. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve in individual bowls and garnish with cilantro.

 

*To reduce fat, omit cream (cream is included in nutritional breakdown).

 

Nutritional Breakdown Per Serving: Calories 220; Fat Grams 14; Carbohydrate grams 7; Cholesterol mg 25; Sodium ms 266.

 

The Point System Per Serving: Calorie Points 2; Protein Points 1; Fat Grams 14; Sodium Points 12; Fiber Points 2; Carbohydrate Points 1; Cholesterol Points 1.

         

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      Italian
Wedding Soup

 

Serves: 8

Preparation Time: 40 minutes

Equipment: French chef knife, Cutting Board, medium stainless Mixing Bowl, Medium Skillet, 4-quart Stockpot.

 

MEATBALLS

½             pound (230 g) extra lean ground beef

1              teaspoon fresh basil, chopped

2              cloves garlic, minced

2              tablespoon tomato paste

½             cup Italian bread crumbs

1              egg

 

SOUP

8              cups chicken broth or homemade chicken stock

3              eggs, beaten

1              cup Pastina (tiny stars) pasta

4              cups whole fresh spinach leaves

 

In mixing bowl, combine beef, basil, garlic, tomato juice, ketchup, bread crumbs and egg, mix well and form into (16-20) small meatballs.

 

Preheat skillet over medium heat and brown meatballs. Remove with a slotted spoon to paper towel to drain.

 

In 4-quart, add chicken stock and bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then stir in eggs. Add pasta, reduce heat to medium, and simmer until pasta is cooked.

 

To serve; place 3-4 meatballs in bowl, add spinach leaves and pour soup mixture into bowl.

 

NUTRITIONAL BREAKDOWN PER SERVING: Calories 167; Fat Grams 8; Carbohydrate Grams 12; Protein Grams 12; Cholesterol mg 130; Sodium mg 230 (155 with homemade chicken stock).

 

THE POINT SYSTEM: Calorie Points 2; Protein Points 2; Fat Grams 8; Sodium Points 10 (7 with homemade chicken stock); Fiber Points ½; Carbohydrate Points 1; Cholesterol Points 13.

 

           

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   Chinese

Beef-Noodle

     Soup

 

Serves: 12

Preparation Time: 2 ½ hours

Equipment: French chef knife, Cutting Board, Kitchen Machine, 6-quart Stockpot, Slotted Spoon, 4-quart Stockpot

 

2 ½         pounds (1.2 kg) beef short ribs

7              cups (1.7 kg) water (distilled if possible)

¼             cup (60 ml) low sodium soy sauce

¼             cup (60 ml) dry sherry

1              tablespoon sugar

6              slices fresh ginger, sliced #4 blade

8              green onions, chopped

4              cloves garlic, chopped

1              teaspoon aniseed

¼             teaspoon dried hot red pepper flakes

2              turnips, peeled and cut into ¼ inch cubes

6              ounces (180 g) egg noodles or rice noodles

 

In 6-quart Stockpot (6 L Utensil) combine ribs, water, soy sauce, sherry, and sugar. Bring to boil, skim off froth. Add ginger, half of green onions, garlic, aniseed, and pepper flakes. Reduce heat to low, cover with vent open, and simmer two hours.

 

Remove from heat. Cool 30 minutes. Remove ribs with slotted spoon.  Chop meat, discarding fat and bones. Strain broth through fine sieve into smaller 4-quart Stockpot, and add chopped meat. Skim fat or, if time permits, refrigerate and lift fat from surface. Add turnips to broth, simmer covers with vent open 10 minutes, add noodles, and simmer for 7-10 minutes or until done. Serve garnished with chopped green onions.

 

NUTRIONAL BREAKDOWN PER SERVING: Calories 234; Fat Grams 6; Carbohydrate Grams 7; Protein Grams 23; Cholesterol Grams 59; Sodium Grams 256.

 

THE POINT SYSTEM: Calorie Points 3; Protein Points 3; Fat Grams 6; Sodium Points 1; Fiber Points 0; Carbohydrate Points ½; Cholesterol Points 6.

 

                       

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   French

Onion Soup

 

Serves: 6

Preparation Time: 1 hour 15 minutes

Equipment: French chef knife, Cutting Board, 4-quart Stockpot

 

8              onions (Vidalia)

6              cloves garlic, chopped

1              tablespoon unsalted butter

6              cups homemade chicken stock or chicken broth

½             cup burgundy wine

6              slices French bread, ¼ inch thick

1              cup Monterey Jack, mozzarella or Swiss cheese

 

In 4-quart Stockpot (4 L Utensil), over medium heat, caramelize onion and garlic in butter and oil until translucent and creamy, approximately 30 minutes. Add chicken stock and burgundy wine. Reduce heat and simmer with cover on and vent open an additional 30 minutes.

 

While soup is simmering, toast French bread in toaster or oven until light brown and dry.

 

Ladle soup into broil safe bowls. Place one slice of bread on top, cover with mixed cheese, and broil until cheese melts and begins to brown.

 

NUTRIONAL BREAKDOWN PER SERVING: Calories 337; Fat Grams 15; Carbohydrate Grams 42; Protein Grams 18; Cholesterol Grams 30; Sodium Grams 432 (277 if homemade chicken stock).

 

THE POINT SYSTEM: Calorie Points 5; Protein Points 2; Fat Grams 15; Sodium Points 19 (11 if homemade chicken stock); Fiber Points 2; Carbohydrate Points 3; Cholesterol Points 3.

 

                       

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Pinto Bean

    Soup

 

Serves: 12

Preparation Time: 1 hour 30 minutes

Equipment: Kitchen Machine food cutter, French chef knife, Cutting Board, 6-quart Stockpot

 

1              pound (460 g) dried pinto beans

3              medium onions, chopped fine #2 blade

5              cloves garlic, minced

1              tablespoon olive oil

2              red bell peppers, chopped

1              tablespoon chili powder

2              teaspoons ground cumin

6              cups (1.5 L) water

½             pound (230 g) chorizo (optional)

1              32 ounce (920 g) can tomatoes, chopped (or 2 ½ lbs fresh plum tomatoes skinned, seeded and chopped)

2              cups (489 ml) homemade chicken stock (or chicken broth)

2              tablespoons tomato paste

2              limes, juice of

½             cup cilantro, chopped

 

Rinse and pick over beans. Soak overnight in 2” (5 cm) water (or follow recipe for homemade beans above).

 

In 6-quart Stockpot (6 L utensil) sauté onions and garlic in olive oil until softened, add red peppers, chili powder and cumin.

 

Drain soaked beans and add to stockpot with 6 cups (1.5 L) water. Cover, open the vent, and reduce to low heat one hour. If using chorizo, brown and drain on paper towels. Add chorizo, tomatoes, chicken stock and tomato paste to soup, simmer an addition 20-30 minutes or until heated through.

 

Serve with 1 teaspoon of lime juice in individual bowls, and top with cilantro.

 

NUTRIONAL BREAKDOWN PER SERVING: Calories 133; Fat Grams 10; Carbohydrate Grams 20; Protein Grams 12; Cholesterol Grams 5; Sodium Grams 351 (178 if homemade chicken stock and fresh tomatoes).

 

THE POINT SYSTEM: Calorie Points 2; Protein Points 1 ½; Fat Grams 10; Sodium Points 15 (9 if homemade chicken stock and fresh tomatoes); Fiber Points 2; Carbohydrate Points 1 ½; Cholesterol Points ½.

 

                       

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      Leeks,

Mushroom &

 Potato Soup

 

Serves: 12 – 1 cup servings

Preparation Time: 40 minutes

Equipment: French chef knife, Cutting Board, Kitchen Machine food cutter, 4-quart Stockpot, Blender

 

3              cups leeks rinsed well, sliced thin

2              cups fresh mushrooms, sliced blade #4 (turn mushrooms sideways in hopper)

4 ½         cups (1.1 L) water

4              cups red potatoes, diced

1              cup celery, sliced blade #4

1 ½         teaspoons, dry crushed tarragon

1              tablespoon fresh squeezed lemon juice

2              teaspoons low sodium Worcestershire sauce

½             teaspoon ground white pepper

3              tablespoons fresh chives or green onion, minced

 

Place 4-quart Stockpot (4 L utensil) over medium heat until hot. Add leeks and mushrooms, cover, close the vent, and sweet down, about10 minutes or until tender, stirring 2-3 times and replacing the cover.

 

Add water, potatoes, and celery. Bring to a simmer, cover, and cook until potatoes are tender, 25-30 minutes.

 

Place 1 cup vegetable mixture in blender to puree (place cover on blender with measuring cup hole open). Return puree to soup. Stir in tarragon, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, and white pepper.

 

To serve, ladle soup into individual bowls, sprinkle with chives or green onions.

 

NUTRIONAL BREAKDOWN PER SERVING: Calories 124; Fat Grams 0; Carbohydrate Grams 29; Protein Grams 4; Cholesterol Grams 0; Sodium mg 57.

 

THE POINT SYSTEM: Calorie Points 1 ½; Protein Points 0; Fat Grams 0; Sodium Points 2; Fiber Points 2; Carbohydrate Points 2; Cholesterol Points 0.

 

                       

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     Boeuf

Bourguinon

 

Serves: 8

Preparation Time: 2 ½ hours

Equipment: French chef knife, Cutting Board, 6-quart Stockpot, Medium Skillet

 

2              pounds (1 kg) sirloin steak cut in ¼-inch cubes

3              shallots, peeled and chopped

3              cloves garlic, chopped

4              tablespoons flour

3              cups (720 ml) dry red wine

1              bay leaf

2              cups (480 ml) beef stock, heated (or homemade beef stock to reduce sodium)

1              teaspoon basil

1              teaspoon fresh parsley, chopped

2              tablespoons unsalted butter

24           pearl onions, peeled

1              pound (460 g) fresh mushrooms, cleaned and halved

 

Preheat 6-quart (6 L) Stockpot over medium heat. Add sirloin and sear on all sides. Add shallots and garlic, sauté for about 5 minutes. Sprinkle flour over meat a tablespoon at a time, stirring to combine ingredients, sauté 4-5 minutes.

 

Add wine to deglaze, bay leaf and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Cook uncovered until liquid is reduced by about two-thirds. Add beef stock, basil, and parsley. Cover with the vent open, reduce heat to low and simmer 2 hours.

 

About 30 minutes before serving, heat butter in Skillet over medium heat. Add pearl onions and mushrooms, sauté about 5 minutes, and then add to stew.

 

Serve with toasted Italian or French bread.

 

 

NUTRITIONAL BREAKDOWN PER SERVING: Calories 345; Fat Grams 6; Carbohydrate Grams 14; Protein Grams 50; Cholesterol mg 50; Sodium mg 847 (508 with homemade beef stock).

 

THE POINT SYSTEM: Calorie Points 4 ½; Protein Points 6; Fat Grams 6; Sodium Points 37 (22 with homemade beef stock); Fiber Points 1; Carbohydrate Points 1; Cholesterol Points 5.

 

         

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 Pork ‘n

Pineapple

  Chili

 

Serves: 12

Preparation Time: 3 hours

Equipment: French chef knife, Cutting Board, Kitchen Machine food cutter, 6-quart Stockpot

 

2              pounds (920 g) lean pork cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) cubes

3              cloves garlic, minced

2              medium onions, peeled and chopped #2 blade

1              28 ounce (800 g) can chopped tomatoes, or 3 pounds plum tomatoes peeled and seeded

1              6 ounce (170 g) can tomato paste

1              4 ounce (120 g) can diced green chilies

1              green pepper, chopped

¼             cup chili powder

4              teaspoons ground cumin

1              tablespoon jalapeno chilies, seeded and diced

1              cup (240 ml) water

1              fresh cut pineapple cut into 1-inch cubes

1              can northern white beans (optional)

 

Preheat 6-quart (6 L) over medium-high heat for 3-4 minutes. Sprinkle a few drops of water in the pan. If the water droplets dance, the pan is ready. If the water evaporates, the pan is not hot enough. Place the pork in the hot, dry pan, which will be about 400°F (200°C). Cover the pan, and open the vent and dry sauté until browned on all sides, about 10 minutes, stir occasionally. Remove to paper towel to drain.

 

Drain excess grease from Stockpot; add onions and garlic, sauté until tender.

 

Add remaining ingredients, reduce the heat to low, cover with the vent closed, and simmer 2 ½ hours.

 

To Serve: Spoon into individual serving bowls, serve with cornbread.

 

 

NUTRITIONAL BREAKDOWN PER SERVING: Calories 247; Fat Grams 11; Carbohydrate Grams 24; Protein Grams 14; Cholesterol mg 35; Sodium mg 230 (with fresh plum tomatoes 138).

 

THE POINT SYSTEM: Calorie Points 3 ½; Protein Points 2; Fat Grams 11; Sodium Points 10; Fiber Points 3; Carbohydrate Points 1½; Cholesterol Points 3.

 

         

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Blarney Stone

       Stew

 

Serves: 12

Preparation Time: 1 ½ hours

Equipment: French chef knife, Cutting Board, Kitchen Machine food cutter, 4-quart Stockpot

 

2              pounds (920 g) beef stew meat, trimmed of fat, and cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) cubes

2              cups (480 ml) dry red wine

2              cloves garlic, minced

½             teaspoon fresh rosemary, finely minced (or dried, crushed)

½             teaspoon fresh thyme, finely minced (or dried, crushed)

2              teaspoons orange zest, grated #1 blade

¼             teaspoon pepper

½             cup (120 ml) water

12           carrot slices, sliced on #4 blade

6              pearl onions, peeled and halved

6              new or red potatoes, quartered

1              cup mushrooms, slice #4 blade (lay sideways in hopper to slice)

1              small head red cabbage, shredded #5 blade

1              green pepper, chopped

1              15 ounce (425 g) can stewed tomatoes

2              tablespoons cornstarch (or homemade roux, see recipe at Stocks & Sauces)

2              tablespoons cold water

 

Preheat skillet over medium-high heat for 3-4 minutes. Sprinkle a few drops of water in the pan. If the water droplets dance, the pan is ready. If the water evaporates, the pan is not hot enough. Place the stew beef in the hot, dry skillet, which will be about 400°F (200°C). Cover the pan, and open the vent and dry sauté until stew beef releases easily from the pan, 4 to 5 minutes. Turn the stew beef, cover the pan and brown on other side until beef release easily from the skillet, 4 to 5 minutes. Repeat the process until beef is browned on all sides.

 

Deglaze Stockpot with wine, add garlic, rosemary, thyme, orange zest, pepper, ½ cup water. Bring to a simmer, reduce the heat to low, cover with the vent open and simmer one hour.

 

Add carrots, onions, potatoes, mushrooms, and stewed tomatoes, cover and continue to cook 30 to 40 minutes or until meat and vegetables are tender.

 

Combine cornstarch with 2 tablespoons of water, mix well, and add to stew (optional, 2 tablespoons homemade roux).

 

To Serve: Ladle stew into individual serving bowl, to with snipped parsley, and serve with Irish Soda bread (see recipe at Stove Top Baking).

 

 

NUTRITIONAL BREAKDOWN PER SERVING: Calories 252; Fat Grams 4; Carbohydrate Grams 26; Protein Grams 22; Cholesterol mg 47; Sodium mg 176.

 

THE POINT SYSTEM: Calorie Points 3 ½; Protein Points 3; Fat Grams 4; Sodium Points 8; Fiber Points 2; Carbohydrate Points 1½; Cholesterol Points 5.

 

         

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Pork and

Pumpkin

   Stew

 

Serves: 6

 Time: 1 hour

Equipment: French chef knife, Cutting Board, Kitchen Machine food cutter, 6-quart Stockpot

 

1 ½         pound (700 g) pork tenderloin, trimmed and cut into 1 ½-inch (4 cm) cubes

2              teaspoons olive oil

2              teaspoons whole cumin seeds

1              large onion, peeled and chopped #2 blade

3              cloves garlic, minced

1              14 ounce (400 g) can crushed tomatoes, or 1 ½ pounds plum tomatoes, skinned, seeded and chopped

1              cup (240 ml) defatted reduced-sodium chicken stock, or homemade chicken stock

½             cup (120 ml) dry white wine

½             teaspoon fresh oregano, chopped (or dried)

¼             teaspoon red pepper flakes

1              pound (460 g) fresh pumpkin or butternut squash, peeled and cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) chunks (3 cups)

1              tablespoon cornstarch

1              tablespoon water

3              tablespoons fresh parsley or cilantro, chopped

2              tablespoons pumpkin seeds (pepitas) lightly toasted (optional)

               

Preheat 6-quart Stockpot (6 L) over medium-high heat. Add pork cubes to pan, browning on all sides, transferring to plate. Reduce heat to low, add oil and cumin, sauté 30 seconds, add onion and garlic, sauté 2 minutes. Add tomatoes, chicken stock, wine, oregano, red pepper flakes and reserved pork. Cover with vent open, and continue to cook over low heat 30 minutes.

 

Dissolve cornstarch in water, add to stew to thicken, stirring gently. Add cilantro or parsley, and salt and pepper to taste.

 

Serve with rice, garnished with toasted pumpkin seeds.

 

 

NUTRITIONAL BREAKDOWN PER SERVING: Calories 314; Fat Grams 13; Carbohydrate Grams 18; Protein Grams 30; Cholesterol mg 65; Sodium mg 222.

 

THE POINT SYSTEM: Calorie Points 4; Protein Points 4; Fat Grams 13; Sodium Points 10; Fiber Points 1; Carbohydrate Points 1; Cholesterol Points 6.

 

         

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   Scallop

   Shrimp

Jambalaya

 

Serves: 8

Preparation Time: 40 minutes

Equipment: French chef knife, Cutting Board, Kitchen Machine food cutter, 13-inch Chef Pan

 

1              medium onion, chopped #2 blade

1              large green pepper, chopped

½             cup celery, chopped

1              clove garlic, minced

1              32 ounce (290 g) can stewed tomatoes or 4 fresh tomatoes, quartered

1              cup (240 ml) water

1              cup long grain or brown rice, uncooked

1              bay leaf

½             teaspoon thyme, dried or fresh chopped

1              teaspoon basil, dried or fresh chopped

¼             teaspoon ground red pepper

1              pound fresh shrimp, or 12 ounce (340 g) package frozen shrimp, thawed

½             pound (230 g) bay scallops

 

In 13-inch (33 cm) chef pan, sauté onions, green pepper, celery and garlic over medium heat, about 10 minutes or until tender.

 

Add stewed tomatoes, water, rice, bay leaf, dried thyme, basil and red pepper. Mix well, cover (close vent) and simmer over medium-low heat 15-20 minutes. Top with shrimp and scallops, cover and cook another 15-20 minutes.   

 

 

NUTRITIONAL BREAKDOWN PER SERVING: Calories 175; Fat Grams 1; Carbohydrate Grams 24; Protein Grams 18; Cholesterol mg 79; Sodium mg 783.

 

THE POINT SYSTEM: Calorie Points 2 ½; Protein Points 2; Fat Grams 1; Sodium Points 34; Fiber Points 2; Carbohydrate Points 1 ½; Cholesterol Points 8.

         

Seafood Filé

   Gumbo

 

Serves: 6

Preparation Time: 50 minutes

Equipment: French chef knife, Cutting Board, Kitchen Machine food cutter,

 

5              cups (1.25 L) water

1              teaspoon Old Bay seasoning

6              crayfish

½             pound (230 g) pork shoulder, cut in 1 ½” cubed

2              tablespoons unsalted butter or low calorie margarine

1              onion, sliced

1              green pepper, sliced

2              cloves garlic, minced

3              tablespoons flour

½             teaspoon thyme, fresh or dried

1              bay leaf

2              tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped

½             teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

12           oysters, fresh or frozen

1              pound (460 g) shrimp, peeled and deveined

8              tomatoes, seeded and chopped

2              cups sliced okra, blade #4

2              tablespoons filé powder

 

In the 3-quart (3 L utensil) Saucepan, bring water to a boil over medium-high heat. Add Old Bay and crayfish; simmer about 8-10 minutes.

 

Preheat the 6-quart Stockpot over medium or medium-high heat, about 3 minutes. Test the surface with a few water droplets. If the droplets bead up and dance across the surface, the pan is hot enough to brown the pork and seal in juices. Place the pork in the pan; it will stick at first while browning. Cover the pan and open the vent. When the pork loosens, about 3-5 minutes, turn it to brown on the other sides. About 3-4 minutes each side. Remove to a platter.

Add butter, onion, pepper and garlic, and sauté until tender, about 3-4 minutes. To make a Roux, sprinkle in flour, and stir constantly until flour turns a pale golden brown.  Gradually add strained crayfish stock into 6-quart and continue to stir until crayfish stock and onion, pepper roux is completely incorporated.

Add thyme, bay leaf, parsley, Worcestershire sauce, oysters, shrimp, tomatoes and reserved pork, and bring to a simmer. Stir in okra and filé powder.

Serve over rice.

 

NUTRITIONAL BREAKDOWN PER SERVING: Calories 432; Fat Grams 8; Carbohydrate Grams 52; Protein Grams 39; Cholesterol mg 59; Sodium mg 732.

 

THE POINT SYSTEM: Calorie Points 6; Protein Points 5; Fat Grams 8; Sodium Points 32; Fiber Points 1; Carbohydrate Points 3 ½; Cholesterol Points 16.

 

                       

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